Terrorists are poisoning America's water supplies using an Environmental Cleanup company as a cover. When ousted CEO Nick Kuiper hires a beautiful con artist and her legendary grifter father to get his company back they tumble to the plot and all hell breaks loose.


America will reel from this blow like she was struck by the fist of God.


Go to my website at www.RaymondDeanWhite.com to read a sample chapter.

AVAILABLE NOW ON AMAZON.COM 

http://amzn.to/29ozNIY 

I hope you'll give my latest book here a try. And if you do, don't be shy. Tell me what you think about it and post reviews on Amazon and GoodReads, okay?

"AMERICAN JIHAD" the second book in the War Corps series (following TAP DOUBT) is in editing and hopefully will be released next month or in early February.

MERRY CHRISTMAS and may you and yours enjoy a healthy, happy and prosperous NEW YEAR!

 

PERSONAL UPDATE

My wife has been in and out of the hospital for the past six months and we have yet to see a light at the end of this particular tunnel. Writing is on hold until she gets better. As much as I'd like to resume editing AMERICAN JIHAD or writing FREEDOM RISING I simply can not do that and give her the care she requires. Family first you know, and she is everything to me.

On the positive side I'm now an official Amazon Bestseller. The Dying Time: Impact recently hit #2 in Dystopian Fiction and #2 in War and Military. 

AUTHOR RECOMMENDATION and FREE EBOOK

Meanwhile, I'd like to suggest you give my friend and occasional co-author Duane Lindsay's book a try. His Missing Amanda is available for FREE on his website. It's a 1950's era private eye tale with a surprise twist at the end and a lot of humor and unconventional action throughout. When I was editing it for him I found myself chuckling--a lot. Here's a link to his website:

Author Duane Lindsay

PREPPER INFO

How to Store Vegetables Without a Root Cellar

A couple of months ago I did an article on using mylar bags to store food long term in buckets. Here's an article reprinted with the kind permission of my friend Gaye Levy. Do yourselves a favor and visit her terrific website Backdoor Survival (Prepping With Optimism). And now, without further ado here's you, learning how to store vegetables without a root cellar.

Anyone who loves to garden, especially those who wish to be able to provide wholesome foods for themselves and their families and live independently enough to survive economic or natural disasters will need to know what to do with all of the surplus from the summer. It’s great to be able to eat vegetables right out of the ground, but it is just as important to have good food all winter long. There are many methods of preservation.

The way you store each vegetable will depend on its needs and its hardiness. Here are ways to keep all of your produce, and especially the root vegetables, in great shape for the long winter months.


Keeping “The Roots” in Good Shape For Storage

Root vegetables are a great resource because they can be stored easily and last a long time without extensive preparation. Plus, root vegetables are amongst the hardiest of the garden crops, and are relatively easy to store without processes such as canning, or even freezing. Here are some great ways to keep those delicious roots and other hardy vegetables in tip-top shape long after the garden has been harvested for the winter.

Put Them to Bed in Their Bed

One great way to store root vegetables like carrots, beets, potatoes and radishes is to leave them right where they are in the garden. Cover them well with a hefty bed of straw or wood shavings, or use a garden blanket that can be found in many hardware or garden stores to keep them tucked in nicely for whenever you need them.

Toss it in a Trash Can

If you have a garden, make use of it during the winter by digging a hole and burying a garbage can up to the lip in the ground. Then layer root vegetables inside, covering each layer with a generous topping of sawdust or straw, and sealing it with the cover. Open up the instant root cellar whenever you need to go “shopping” and pull out what you need from the top layer, then recover. It’s easiest to have a separate can for each type of vegetable being stored in this manner so that you can easily have access to what you need on the top layer of each particular can.

No Ground? No Problem

Even if you live in an apartment or city home with little or no outdoor space you can stock up on root vegetables when they are their most affordable, and have them all year long. All you have to do is build a quick and easy storage for them. A small plastic bin with a cover will do the job nicely. Even a plastic lined box will do well as long as it can be covered up.

Place the vegetables in layers, alternating each with sawdust, straw or a thick layer of newspaper and cover. Remove vegetables as needed all winter long. When kept inside the home, try to place the storage containers in a cool room that can be closed off from heat. Close vents and do not insulate windows in the room.

Know Each Individual Root’s Needs

Some vegetables like it dry and some like it damp. For those that like the atmosphere a little moist, storage in basements, attics, unheated garages, sheds, porches or covered decks are good spots. In homes without those areas, storing on an exterior wall, preferably with a north wall is the best choice. If the storage is in one of the outdoor locations or unheated garages or attics, the temperatures should always stay below 60 degrees, but not go below freezing.

The cold and damp root vegetables include:

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Radishes
  • Turnips
  • Potatoes
Those that prefer it cold and dry include:
  • Onions
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Winter squashes

Most tubers love darkness. They are best stored in some type of box with a lid indoor, although you can also line a drawer or laundry basket and cover the roots with newspaper for insulation and to keep the light off of them.

Some, like potatoes, do not like it too cold. Allowing them to drop too much below 50 degrees will release the starches in them. Onions need much more air circulation than many of the root veggies. Storing them in a netting in a dark place or in a wire basket or laundry basket where air can circulate freely will keep them lasting all through the winter. They should not be covered at all, but they still need to be out of direct light.

Keep Them Growing for a Little Extra Bonus

Want some extra salad greens for soups and salads all winter long? Plant some beets, turnip or radish bulbs in a pot of soil and place it in a sunny location in your home. They will sprout delicious tops that can be cut continuously all winter for an added treat.

Be Aware of Shelf Life

Even the most well-preserved vegetable will have a shelf life. More tender roots such as beets, celeriac, Jerusalem artichokes, rutabagas, and turnips will only last 1 to 5 months in dry storage. Hardier roots like carrots, parsnips and potatoes can be stored for between 4 and 6 months. Powerhouses such as horseradish can last as long as a year in storage, but tender kohlrabi will only be good for a few weeks no matter how well you prepare the space.

Prepare Roots for Dry Storage

The better you handle the preparation for storing your root vegetables, the better chance they have for lasting. Make sure you harvest in cool, dry weather and let them dry out on the surface of the soil for 8 to 10 hours to toughen them up a little bit. Cut the foliage down to the crown, and make sure to only store clean, undamaged vegetables. Use up any that have any signs of damage or blemishes immediately.

Other Vegetable Preservation Methods
Preserving Fragile Vegetables

Certain vegetables require careful handling to last beyond their normal fresh shelf-life. These include watery vegetables such as zucchini, peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers. Many other vegetables can be canned, or as you will see, are also storable in other ways.

Freeze What You Can

Freezing is a fantastic, easy and quick way to store almost anything from the garden. It is especially good for those vegetables you will be consuming within a three-month period.

Use only strong freezer bags and squeeze as much air out of them as possible when sealing the vegetables in. While this is a great way to store vegetables, it does take up a lot of valuable freezer space, even for homes with large stand-alone freezers. In addition, you could lose your frozen goods in an extended power outage.

For that reason, it is probably best to limit how many root and other vegetables are stored in this manner in favor of other methods.

Canning for Long-Term Dry Storage

Canning is a time-honored traditional way to store many of the types of vegetables that can’t keep on a shelf or root cellar. The drawback to canning is that it takes a lot of time, some special equipment, practice and the vegetables may contain more preservatives and salt than frozen or naturally stored vegetables do. In spite of the drawbacks, canning is an important resource for some of the more fragile vegetables that can’t be stored in other ways, such as tomatoes.

End of Article

My grandparents survived the Great Depression of the 1930's on a two and one half acre lot on the outskirts of a small town in SE Kansas. While they did pressure canning and dehydrating to preserve meats and veggies they had a root cellar/storm cellar in which much of their canned produce as well as root crops were stored. 

Now since going out to the root cellar in wintertime was NOT one of my grandma's favorite past times she used bushel baskets kept in a cold bedroom with root veggies layered as described in Gaye Levy's article above. Sometimes she used straw or slightly damp sand, but she usually went with newspapers to avoid the mess.
 
Thanks for reading and I hope you live well and prosper until we meet again next month.

 

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